Archive for waf

Updating an Auto-Scaled BIG-IP VE WAF in AWS

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud computing, infrastructure, waf, aws by psilva on May 23rd, 2017

Update servers while continuing to process application traffic.

Recently we've been showing how to deploy BIG-IP (and F5 WAF) in various clouds like Azure and AWS.

Today, we’ll take a look at how to update an AWS auto-scaled BIG-IP VEBIG-IP VE web application firewall (WAF) that was initially created by using this F5 github template. This solution implements auto-scaling of BIG-IP Virtual Edition (VE) Web Application Firewall (WAF) systems in Amazon Web Services. The BIG-IP VEs have the Local Traffic Manager (LTM) and Application Security Manager (ASM) modules enabled to provide advanced traffic management and web application security functionality. As traffic increases or decreases, the number of BIG-IP VE WAF instances automatically increases or decreases accordingly.

Prerequisites:

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So, let’s assume you used the CFT to create a BIG-IP WAF in front of your application servers…and your business is so successful that you need to be able to process more traffic. You do not need to tear down your deployment and start over – you can make changes to your current deployment while the WAF is still running and protecting your environment.

For this article, a few examples of things you can change include increasing the throughput limit. For instance, When you first configured the WAF, you choose a specific throughput limit for BIG-IP. You can update that. You may also have selected a smaller AWS instance size and now want to choose a larger AWS instance type and add more CPU. Or, you may have set up your auto-scaling group to launch a maximum of two instances and now you want to be able to update the auto-scaling group attributes and add three.

This is all possible so let’s check it out.

The first thing we want to do is connect to one of the BIG-IP VE instances and save the latest configuration. We open putty, login and run the TMSH command (save /sys ucs /var/tmp/original.ucs) to save the UCS config file.

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Then we use WinSCP to copy the UCS files to the desktop. You can use whatever application you like and copy the file wherever you like as this is just a temporary location.

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Once that’s done, open the AWS Management Console and go to the S3 bucket. This bucket was created when you first deployed the CFT and locate yours.

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When you find your file, click it and then click the Backup folder.

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Once there, now upload the UCS file into that folder.

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The USC is now in the folder.

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The last step is to redeploy the CFT and change the selected options. From the main AWS Management Console, click CloudFormation, select your Stack and under Actions, click Update Stack.

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Next, you can see the template we originally deployed and to update, click Next.

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Scroll down the page to Instance Configuration to change the instance type size.

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Right under that is Maximum Throughput to update the throughput limit.

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And a little further down under Auto Scaling Configuration is where you can update the max number of instances. When done click Next at the bottom of the page.

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It’ll ask you to review and confirm the changes. Click Update.

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You can watch the progress and if your current BIG-IP VE instance is actively processing traffic, it will remain active until the new instance is ready.  Give it a little time to ensure the new instance is up and added to the auto scaling group before we terminate the other instance.

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When it is done, we’ll confirm a few things.

Go to the EC2 Dashboard and check the running instances. We can see the old instance is terminated and the new instance is now available. You can also check the instance size and within the auto scaling group you can see the new maximum for number of instances.

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And we’re deployed.

You can follow this same workflow to update other attributes of your F5 WAF. This allows you to update your servers while continuing to process traffic.

Thanks to our TechPubs group, you can also watch the video demo.

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Deploying F5’s Web Application Firewall in Microsoft Azure Security Center

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, silva, microsoft, application delivery, waf, azure by psilva on May 9th, 2017

Use F5’s Web Application Firewall (WAF) to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure.

Applications living in the Cloud still need protection. Data breaches, compromised credentials, system vulnerabilities, DDoS attacks and shared resources can all pose a threat to your cloud infrastructure. The Verizon DBIR notes that web application attacks are the most likely vector for a data breach attack. While attacks on web applications account for only 8% of reported incidents, according to Verizon, they are responsible for over 40% of incidents that result in a data breach. A 2015 survey found that 15% of logins for business apps used by organizations had been breached by hackers.

One way to stay safe is using a Web Application Firewall (WAF) for your cloud deployments.

Let’s dig in on how to use F5’s WAF to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure. This solution builds on BIG-IP Application Security Manager (ASM) and BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager (LTM) technologies as a preconfigured virtual service within the Azure Security Center.

Some requirements for this deployment are:

  • You have an existing web application deployed in Azure that you want to protect with BIG-IP ASM
  • You have an F5 license token for each instance of BIG-IP ASM you want to use

To get started, log into your Azure dashboard and on the left pane, toward the bottom, you’ll see Security Center and click it.

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Next, you’ll want to click the Recommendations area within the Security Center Overview.

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And from the list of recommendations, click Add a web application firewall.

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A list of available web applications opens in a new pane. From the application list, select the application you want to secure.

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And from there click Create New. You’ll get a list of available vendors’ WAFs and choose F5 Networks.

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A new page with helpful links and information appears and at the bottom of the page, click Create.

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First, select the number of machines you want to deploy – in this case we’re deploying two machines for redundancy and high availability. Review the host entry and then type a unique password for that field. When you click Pricing Tier, you can get info about sizing and pricing. When you are satisfied, at the bottom of that pane click OK.

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Next, in the License token field, copy and paste your F5 license token. If you are only deploying one machine, you’ll only see one field. For the Security Blocking Level, you can choose Low, Medium or High. You can also click the icon for a brief description of each level. From the Application Type drop down, select the type of application you want to protect and click OK (at the bottom of that pane).

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Once you see two check marks, click the Create button.

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Azure then begins the process of the F5 WAF for your application. This process can take up to an hour. Click the little bell notification icon for the status of the deployment.

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You’ll receive another notification when the deployment is complete.

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After the WAF is successfully deployed, you’ll want to test the new F5 WAF and finalize the setup in Azure including changing the DNS records from the current server IP to the IP of the WAF.

When ready, click Security Center again and the Recommendations panel. This time we’ll click Finalize web application firewall setup.

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And click your Web application.

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Ensure your DNS settings are correct and check the I updated my DNS Settings box and when ready, click Restrict Traffic at the bottom of the pane.

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Azure will give you a notification that it is finalizing the WAF configuration and settings, and you will get another notification when complete.

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And when it is complete, your application will be secured with F5’s Web Application Firewall.

Check out the demo video and rest easy, my friend.

ps

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Ask the Expert – Are WAFs Dead?

Posted in security, f5, application security, silva, privacy, waf by psilva on November 2nd, 2015

Brian McHenry, Sr. Security Solution Architect, addresses the notion that Web Application Firewalls are dead and talks about what organizations need to focus on today when protecting their data and applications across a diverse environment. He discusses many of the current application threats, how to protect your data across hybrid environments and the importance of a security policy that is portable across many environments. Move on from the idea of a traditional WAF and embrace hybrid WAF architectures.

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Connect with Peter: Connect with F5:
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Inside Look: BIG-IP ASM Botnet and Web Scraping Protection

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, application security, silva, video, intellectual property, cybercrime, hackers, waf by psilva on February 21st, 2013

I hang with WW Security architect Corey Marshall to get an inside look at the Botnet detection and Web scraping protection in BIG-IP ASM.

 

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