Archive for iot

Is 2017 Half Empty or Half Full?

Posted in big-ip, availability, cloud, application delivery, mobile, cybercrime, breach, dns, iot, 2017 by psilva on August 30th, 2017

Ransomware seems to be this year’s huge trend

aug17.jpgWith 2017 crossing the half way point, let's look at some technology trends thus far.

Breaches: Many personal records are half empty due to the continued rash of intrusions while the crooks are half full of our personal information along with some ransom payments. According to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), there have been 7,689 breaches since 2005 (when they started tracking) compromising – get this – 900,315,392 records. Almost 3 times the U.S. population. In 2016, 56% of all Data Breaches began with a user clicking on a phishing email. The big story for 2017 I think, is the rise of ransomware. Kaspersky reports a 250% increase in ransomware for the first few months of 2017. From WannaCry to Petya to Fusob, criminals are holding systems hostage until a ransom is paid…or not. Ransomware seems to be this year’s big trend with backups saving some from total embarrassment.

Cloud Computing: RightScale 2017 State of the Cloud Report notes that Hybrid Cloud Is the preferred enterprise strategy, with 85 percent of enterprises have a multi-cloud strategy (up from 82 percent in 2016) and Cloud Users Are Running Applications in Multiple Clouds. An interesting stat from the report says, cloud users are running applications in an average of 1.8 public clouds and 2.3 private clouds. We got hybrid cars, hybrid corn, hybrid cats and hybrid clouds but The Cloud is Still just a Datacenter Somewhere so no need to freak out. Cloud seems to be more than half full as the security and expertise challenges decline.

DNS: I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, DNS is one of the most important components of a functioning internet. With that, it presents unique challenges to organizations. 2016 saw record-breaking DNS-based attacks and outages, which thrust DNS management into the spotlight as both a vulnerability and a critical asset. In 2016 DNS provider Dyn experienced a huge DDoS attack taking out many popular websites and internet cameras. And a new attack uncovered this year, DNSMessenger, uses DNS queries to conduct malicious PowerShell commands on compromised computers – a technique that makes the remote access trojan difficult to detect on targeted systems. The need for DNS continues to be half-full with the influx of IoT devices so it’ll continue to be a valuable target for riff-raff.

IoT: What can I say? The cup runneth over…again. Gartner has identified the Top 10 IoT technologies that should be on every organization's radar for 2017 and 2018. They include things like new security risks and challenges to the IoT devices themselves, their platforms and operating systems, their communications, and even the systems to which they're connected. Analytics to understand customer behavior, to deliver services and improve products. Device management, device processors, operating systems, platforms, standards and even the networks IoT devices use are all areas of attention. IoT is really three-quarters full both with the opportunities and potential risks. And the risks can be deadly when monitoring vital information like human vital signs.

Mobile: We are mobile, our devices are mobile and the applications we access are mobile. Mobility, in all its iterations, is a huge enabler and concern for enterprises and it'll only get worse as we start wearing our connected clothing to the office. 5G is still a couple years away but AT&T and Verizon have already lined up trials of their 5G networks for 2017. Mobile is certainly half full and there is no emptying it now.

That's what I got so far and I'm sure 2017's second half will bring more amazement, questions and wonders. We'll do our year-end reviews and predictions for 2018 as we all lament, where did the Year of the Rooster go?

There's that old notion that if you see a glass half full, you're an optimist and if you see it half empty you are a pessimist. I think you need to understand what state the glass itself was before the question. Was it empty and filled half way or was it full and poured out? There's your answer!

ps

This article originally appeared on F5.com.

 

 

 




Lightboard Lessons: IoT on BIG-IP

Posted in f5, big-ip, lightboard, devcentral, mqtt, iot, sensors by psilva on February 8th, 2017

As more organizations deploy IoT applications in their data centers and clouds, they're going to need their ADC to understand the unique protocols these devices use to communicate.

In this Lightboard Lesson, I light up how IoT protocol MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport) works on BIG-IP v13. iRules allow you to do Topic based load balancing along with sensor authentication. And if you missed it, here is the #LBL on What is MQTT?

ps

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Security Trends in 2016: Securing the Internet of Things

Posted in security, big-ip, application security, devcentral, iot, sensors by psilva on February 7th, 2017

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Whenever you connect anything to the internet, there is risk involved. Just ask the millions of IoT zombies infected with Mirai. Sure, there have been various stories over the years about hacking thermostats, refrigerators, cameras, pacemakers, insulin pumps and other medical devices along with cars, homes and hotel rooms…but Mirai took it to a new level.

And it’s not the only IoT botnet out there nor are these nasty botnets going away anytime soon. There’s a gold mine of unprotected devices out there waiting to either have their/your info stolen or be used to flood another website with traffic.

This is bound to compound in the years to come.

A recent Ponemon Institute report noted that an incredible 80% of IoT applications are not tested for vulnerabilities. Let’s try that again – only 20% of the IoT applications that we use daily are tested for vulnerabilities. There’s probably no indication or guarantee that the one you are using now has been tested.

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Clearly a trend we saw in 2016, and seems to continue into 2017, is that people are focusing too much on the ‘things’ themselves and the coolness factor rather than the fact that anytime you connect something to the internet, you are potentially exposing yourself to thieves. There has been such a rush to get products to market and make some money off a new trend yet these same companies ignore or simply do not understand the potential security threats. This somewhat mimics the early days of internet connectivity when insecure PCs dialed up and were instantly inundated with worms, viruses and email spam. AV/FW software soon came along and intended to reduce those threats.

Today it’s a bit different but the cycle continues.

Back then you’d probably notice that your computer was acting funky, slowing down or malfunctioning since we interacted with it daily. Today, we typically do not spend every waking hour working with our IoT devices. They’re meant to function independently to grab data, make adjustments and alert us on a mobile app with limited human interaction. That’s the ‘smart’ part everyone talks about. But these botnets are smart themselves. With that, you may never know that your DVR is infected and allowing someone across the globe (or waiting at the nearest street corner) watch your every move.

Typical precautions we usually hear are actions like changing default passwords, not connecting it directly to the internet and updating the firmware to reduce the exposure. Software developers, too, need to plan and build in security from the onset rather than an afterthought. The security vs. usability conundrum that plagues many web applications extends to IoT applications also. But you wouldn’t, or I should say, shouldn’t deploy a financial application without properly testing it for vulnerabilities. There the risk is financial loss but with IoT and particularly medical/health devices the result can be deadly.

Mirai was just the beginning of the next wave of vulnerability exploitation. More chaos to come.

ps

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Lightboard Lessons: What is MQTT?

Posted in f5, big-ip, lightboard, devcentral, infrastructure, mqtt, m2m, iot, sensors by psilva on January 11th, 2017

The mad dash to connect virtually every noun to the internet or The Internet of Things, is creating a massive M2M network for all the devices, systems, sensors and actuators to connect & communicate on the Internet.

With that, they need a communications protocol to understand each other. One of those is Message Queue Telemetry Transport (MQTT). MQTT is a “subscribe and publish” messaging protocol designed for lightweight machine-to-machine (or IoT) communications.

In this episode of Lightboard Lessons, I light up how MQTT works.

 

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Blog Roll 2016

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud computing, silva, application delivery, devcentral, infrastructure, access, iot by psilva on December 20th, 2016

dc-logo.jpgIt’s that time of year when we gift and re-gift, just like this text from last year. And the perfect opportunity to re-post, re-purpose and re-use all my 2016 entries.

After 12 years at F5, I had a bit of a transition in 2016, joining the amazing DevCentral team in February as a Sr. Solution Developer. You may have noticed a much more technical bent since then…hopefully. We completed our 101 Certification Exam this year and will be shooting for the 201 next quarter. We started highlighting our community with Featured Member spotlight articles and I finally started contributing to the awesome LightBoard Lessons series. I also had ACDF surgery this year, which is why November is so light. Thanks to the team for all their support this year. You guys are the best!

If you missed any of the 53 attempts including 7 videos, here they are wrapped in one simple entry. I read somewhere that lists in articles are good. I broke it out by month to see what was happening at the time and let's be honest, pure self-promotion. I truly appreciate the reading and watching throughout 2016.

Have a Safe and Happy New Year!

 

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

 

And a couple special holiday themed entries from years past.

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The Intruders of Things

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud computing, silva, application delivery, privacy, devcentral, iot by psilva on August 23rd, 2016

Gartner predicts that by 2020, IoT security will make up 20 percent of annual securitybudgets.

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2020seems to be an important milestone for the Internet of Things. That’s the yearthat Ciscosays there will be 50 billion connected devices and also the year Gartner notes that over 50%of major new business processes and systems will incorporate some elementof the Internet of Things.

That’s the good news.

A recent SymantecInternet Security Threat Report says there are 25 connected devices per 100inhabitants in the US. Minimum 25 entry points to your personal information,not counting your front door, personal computers, compromised ATMs and otherdata sources. As your connected devices grow, so will your exposure. And with noclear methods of identifying and authenticating connected devices,enterprises will have a challenging time getting a handle on how many employeeshirts, shoes, fitness trackers, and smartwatches are connected to thecorporate network. And more importantly, what do they have access to?

The sneaky spreadsheet macro malware will soon be a spoofed critical alertrequiring instant attention.

Healthcare is a prime target for IoT attacks and researchers have alreadycompromised several devices revealing personal info and worse, causing thedevices to malfunction. ‘Hey, why isn’t my heart beating any……

The chaos on the feature first consumer side can be frustrating but nothingcompared to industrial and manufacturing.

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) focuses on industrial controlsystems, device to network access and all the other connective sensorcapabilities. These attacks are less frequent, at least today, butthe consequences can be huge – taking out industrial plants, buildings,tractors, and even entire cities.

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If you think data protection and privacy are hot now, just wait until 2020.Like BYOD, security pros need to be ready for the inevitable not just thepotential of a breach. While the gadgets get all the interest, it’ll be theback end data center infrastructure that will take the brunt of the traffic –good and bad.

Organizations need an infrastructure that can both withstand the trafficgrowth and defend against attacks. Over on F5’s Newsroom, Lori MacVittie talks about the 3Things the Network Must Provide for IoT – delivery, security andvisibility. Things that can communicate securely with back-end apps, ADC’s thatcan understand the languages of things (like MQTT) and the ability to see whatis going on with the things.

Accordingto TechTarget, ensuring high availability of the IoT services will rely onboosting traffic management and monitoring. This will both mitigate businesscontinuity risks, and prevent potential losses. From a project planningstandpoint, organizations need to do capacity planning and watch the growthrate of the network so that the increased demand for the required bandwidth canbe met.

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If you already have BIG-IP inyour back yard, you’re well on your way to being IoTready. You got the networksecurity to protect against inbound attacks; you can offload SSL to improvethe performance of the IoT application servers; you can extend your datacenters to the cloud tosupport IoT deployments; scale IoT applications beyond the data center whenrequired and both encrypt and accelerate IoT connections to the cloud.

A pair of BIG-IPs in the DMZ terminates the connection. They, in turn, intelligentlydistribute the client request to a pool (multiple) of IoT application servers,which then query the database servers for the appropriate content. Each tierhas redundant servers so in the event of a server outage, the others take theload and the system stays available.

The BIG-IP tuning may vary but it is still all about nodes, hosts, members,pools, virtual servers and the profiles and services applied. The BIG-IPplatform is application and location agnostic, meaning the type of applicationor where the application lives does not matter. As long as you tell the BIG-IPwhere to find the IoT application, the BIG-IP platform will deliver it.

ps

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Is 2016 Half Empty or Half Full?

Updating passwords is a huge trend in 2016

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With 2016 crossing the half way point, let's take a look at some technology trends thus far.

Breaches: Well, many databases are half empty due to the continued rash of intrusions while the crooks are half full with our personal information. According to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), there have been 522 breaches thus far in 2016 exposing almost 13,000,000 records. Many are health care providers as our medical information is becoming the gold mine of stolen info. Not really surprising since the health care wearable market is set to explode in the coming years. Many of those wearables will be transmitting our health data back to providers. There were also a bunch of very recognizable names getting blasted in the media: IRS, Snapchat, Wendy’s and LinkedIn. And the best advice we got? Don’t use the same password across multiple sites. Updating passwords is a huge trend in 2016.

Cloud ComputingAccording to IDC, public cloud IaaS revenues are on pace to more than triple by 2020.From $12.6 billion in 2015 to $43.6 billion in 2020. The public cloud IaaS market grew 51% in 2015 but will slightly slow after 2017 as enterprises get past the wonder and move more towards cloud optimization rather than simply testing the waters. IDC also noted that four out of five IT organizations will be committed to hybrid architectures by 2018. While hybrid is the new normal remember, The Cloud is Still just a Datacenter Somewhere. Cloud seems to be more than half full and this comes at a time when ISO compliance in the cloud is becoming even more important.

DNS: I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, DNS is one of the most important components of a functioning internet. With that, it presents unique challenges to organizations. Recently, Infoblox released its Q1 2016 Security Assessment Report and off the bat said, ‘In the first quarter of 2016, 519 files capturing DNS traffic were uploaded by 235 customers and prospects for security assessments by Infoblox. The results: 83% of all files uploaded showed evidence of suspicious activity (429 files).’ They list the specific threats from botnets to protocol anomalies to Zeus and DDoS. A 2014 vulnerability, Heartbleed, still appears around 11% of the time. DevOps is even in the DNS game. In half full news, VeriSign filed two patent applications describing the use of various DNS components to manage IoT devices. One is for systems and methods for establishing ownership and delegation of IoT devices using DNS services and the other is for systems and methods for registering, managing, and communicating with IoT devices using DNS processes. Find that half full smart mug...by name!

IoT: What can I say? The cup runneth over. Wearables are expected to close in on 215 million units shipped by 2020 with 102 million this year alone. I think that number is conservative with smart eyewear, watches and clothing grabbing consumer’s attention. Then there’s the whole realm of industrial solutions like smart tractors, HVAC systems and other sensors tied to smart offices, factories and cities. In fact, utilities are among the largest IoT spenders and will be the third-largest industry by expenditure in IoT products and services. Over $69 billion has already been spent worldwide, according to the IDC Energy Insights/Ericsson report. And we haven’t even touched on all the smart appliances, robots and media devices finding spots our homes. Get ready for Big Data regulations as more of our personal (and bodily) data gets pushed to the cloud. And we’re talking a lot of data.

Mobile: We are mobile, our devices are mobile and the applications we access are mobile. Mobility, in all its iterations, is a huge enabler and concern for enterprises and it'll only get worse as we start wearing our connected clothing to the office. The Digital Dress Code has emerged. With 5G on the way, mobile is certainly half full and there is no empting it now.

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Of course, F5 has solutions to address many of these challenges whether you’re boiling over or bone dry. Our security solutions, including Silverline, can protect against malicious attacks; no matter the cloud -  private, public or hybrid - our Cloud solutions can get you there and back; BIG-IPDNS, particularly DNSExpress, can handle the incredible name request boom as more ‘things’ get connected;and speaking of things, your datacenter will need to be agile enough to handle all the nouns requesting access; and check out how TCP Fast Open can optimize your mobile communications.

That's what I got so far and I'm sure 2016's second half will bring more amazement,questions and wonders. We'll do our year-end reviews and predictions for 2017 as we all lament, where did the Year of the Monkey go?

There's that old notion that if you see a glass half full, you're an optimist and if you see it half empty you are a pessimist. I think you need to understand what state the glass itself was before the question. Was it empty and filled half way or was it full and poured out? There's your answer!

ps 




The Visible Data of the Invisible User

Posted in security, f5, silva, data center, mobile, devcentral, big-iq, iot, sensors, wearable by psilva on May 3rd, 2016

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As the march to connect each and every noun on this planet continues with a blistering pace, the various ways, contraptions and sensors used to collect data is greatly expanding. What once was a (relatively) small collection of fitness trackers, smartwatches, thermostats, automobiles and surveillance cameras has grown into a an industry where shirts, shoes, sleeping bags and even liquor bottles want to gather your info. And most of these devices monitor silently without you even knowing. According to Ryan Matthew Pierson over at Readwrite.com, ‘The strength of IoT is in its ability to be invisible to the user.

In addition, the mad dash to simply insert a chip, beacon and software into everyday objects is slowly graduating to era where user experience, privacy and security are becoming critically important for mass adoption. In 2014 Gartner released a report saying the typical family home could have as many as 500 smart devices by 2022. The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) notes that 20% of US households now own an activity tracking wearable device, two-times the households that owned one last year. And Nielsen reported that smartphone penetration has reached 82% in the U.S.

Interacting and engaging with the customer in real time is a desire of many organizations.

From media and entertainment, to appliances, to transport technologies, to security and environmental controls, along with healthcare and fitness equipment almost every ‘thing’ around us will track something. Or as Dr. Nick Riviera sings, ‘The knee bone's connected to the something. The something's connected to the red thing. The red thing's connected to my wrist watch... Uh oh.’

And it is not only consumer items.

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The Industrial IoT is helping farmers with connected tractors, soil sensors, crop health apps and the like. There are HVAC systems that are managed by sensors; Streetlights, utilities, parking and traffic in a connected city; and even sports teams are using wearable tech to gain a competitive advantage. And according to Research and Markets, wearable tech in schools is set to surge over the next 5 years.

With the IoT growth comes threats, along with resources to reduce the risks. In Gartner’s latest forecast, IoT security spending is set to nearly double between 2014 and 2018, growing from about $232 million to almost $550 million. Nearly $350 million will go into securing IoT this year alone. They also predict that there will be 6.4 billion connected devices in use worldwide this year, up 30% from 2015.

The security investment is good news since according to Spiceworks and Cox Business, the flood of IT devices entering the market does create security and privacy issues in the workplace. 84% of their survey-takers named the growing number of entry points into the network as a major concern. Number two on the list, at 70% of respondents, was insufficient security measures on the part of IoT manufacturers.

But soon we might be able to solve some of the challenges with our Brain.

There are some very smart research brains out there that have come up with a way to identify you by your brain waves with 100% accuracy. This is your Brainprint. A team of researchers at Binghamton University, recorded the brain activity of 50 people wearing an electroencephalogram headset while they looked at a series of 500 images. The pictures were designed specifically to elicit unique responses from person to person. Images included things like pizza, a boat, certain words, celebrities and so forth. They found that participants' brains reacted differently to each image, enough that a computer system was able to identify each volunteer's ‘brainprint’ with 100% accuracy.

According to researchers, brain biometrics are appealing because they are cancellable and cannot be stolen by malicious means like a fingerprint or retina scan. The results indicate that brainwaves could be used by security systems to verify a person's identity. This could be key since our personal data and pattern of life seems to be more valuable now than a silly, worthless credit card number.

Brain & Invisibility: Activate!

   << signed 'ps' in Invisible Ink

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You’re Getting Under My (e)-Skin

Posted in f5, cloud computing, silva, application delivery, big-iq, iot, sensors, wearable by psilva on April 20th, 2016

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Imagine if the temporary tattoos that come in a box of Cracker Jack (if you’re lucky) had an electronic display logo that lights up when you put it on. Or a fitness tracker that you tape to yourself rather than wearing it around your wrist. Or a watch so thin that it lights the time while blending into your skin. Or even, a sensor that can be applied directly to an organ to determine health.

This is the future for electronic skin. Yup, I said it: E-Skin.

Researchers in Japan have developed an ultra-thin and ultra-stretchy material that can mimic the flexibility of human skin. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin is an organic polymer with light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) or small sheets of energy-efficient lights that are laminated right on the skin. These are intended to equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. These are transparent but when powered with electrical pulses, it’ll emit a colored light, number or letter depending on the implementation. The arrangement of PLEDs can also display more complex information. They also report that this PLED film produced less heat and consumed less power than previous e-skin samples.

The interesting thing here is that they used organic materials, added an extra layer of film to protect it from oxygen and water, so it lasted several days. Past organic efforts lasted less than a day due to air exposure. Today, non-organic materials used to make super-thin tattoo-like monitoring devices can last weeks or longer.

These advancements will only fuel the health care wearable market which is growing exponentially.

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Research firm Tractica released findings from its report ‘Wearable Devices for Healthcare Markets’ that show worldwide shipments of healthcare wearables will increase from 2.5 million in 2016 to 97.6 million in 2021…or $17.8 Billion in yearly revenue. The general wearable device market will increase from 85 million units in 2015 to 559.6 million units by 2021 - a compound annual growth rate of about 37%.

If you thought the influx of data center and cloud traffic from mobile was big, just wait until all our body vitals start hitting the wire. Add that to all the other IoT initiates, like home/automotive, big data suddenly turns into ginormous data.

While we may instantly think about the fitness trackers and smartwatches that garner our bodies, the health care industry is also looking at the treatment of chronic diseases, wellness programs, remote patient monitoring and physician use. And there are other devices like posture monitors, connected wearable patches and pain management wearables that are gaining ground.

I can already hear the posture sensor barking, 'Stop Slouching!' and a pain patch that actually works instead of those menthol smelling globs – great idea!

ps

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Hello Infiltrators - Our Doors are Wide Open

Posted in security, f5, silva, privacy, mobile, cybercrime, iot, things, risk, sensors, society by psilva on March 11th, 2016

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In the 1946 classic ‘Hair Raising Hare,’ Bugs Bunny asks, ‘Have you ever have the feeling you were being watched? Like the eyes of strange things are upon you?’ Like Bugs often did, he breaks the fourth wall and involves the audience directly, invoking a feeling that someone is looking over your shoulder.

Today, it is likely the case that you are being watched by the strange (internet of) things that are starting to infiltrate our homes, cars, bodies and the whole of society. While there is a mad rush by people purchasing these things and a similar rush for companies to develop applications and services around those, many are not pausing to either understand the risks or build security into the products.

From home security systems to surveillance cameras to baby monitors to televisions to thermostats, examples pour in daily about flaws and vulnerabilities that leave you, your family and your home exposed. The way things are going, even if you’ve closed and locked your front door physically, that door is wide open to the digital world.

Here are just a few recent examples.

Might as well start with our dwellings. Security researchers at Rapid7 found flaws in in Comcast’s Xfinity Home Security system that would cause it to falsely report that the home’s windows and doors are closed and secured even if they’ve been opened. It also failed to detect an intruder’s motion inside the house. Attacking the system’s communications protocol, they used radio jamming equipment to block the signals that pass from the door, window, or motion sensor to the home’s baseband hub. The system didn’t notice the communication was breached and essentially, failed open without any alert to the owner. When the jammers were turned off, it took minutes to hours for the sensors to reconnect and still didn’t give any indication that a catastrophe could have occurred.

Next, to some of the things inside the insecure house. Experts are predicting that as more connected, smart-TVs enter the home, this will be an avenue for the bad guys to breach your home network. Almost half of U.S. households already have a smart-TV and close to 70% of the sets sold this year will have connectivity capabilities. A threat researcher with Symantec was able to infect his new Andriod-based smart-tele with some ransomware. Within a few seconds, the TV was locked and unusable with the fear inducing pay-up-pop-up ransom note.

Also giving outsiders a view of the inside, Princeton researchers found that certain IoT thermostats were leaking customer zip codes over the internet in clear text. Fortunately, when the manufacturer was notified they quickly issued a patch. There are many horror stories about strangers watching and talking to children via insecure baby monitors. Add to that, toys that record your kid's conversations puts the whole family at risk.

And out on the road, we’ve seen how researchers were able to control a Jeep and last week, researchers were able to remotely control any of the Nissan Leaf’s functions by using the mobile app’s insecure APIs. The unsecured APIs allowed anyone who knows the VIN of a car to access non-critical features like climate control and battery charge management from anywhere on the Internet. Also, someone exploiting the unauthenticated APIs can see the car's estimated driving range. They too, pulled access to the app until they can properly secure the infrastructure and application that supports the mobile app.

Lastly, if you think this is contained within a consumer based household, think again. A recent Ponemon/Lookout survey revealed that an average of 1,700 malware laced mobile devices per company, connect to an enterprise network. Wait ‘til all the insecure wearables start connecting. Employees are often referred to as the weakest link. Today it is mostly their insecure mobile devices but multiply that by a wardrobe, now the risk is enhanced.

ps

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Image courtesy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gossamer_restored.jpg




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