Archive for cloud

Create a BIG-IP HA Pair in Azure

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, application delivery, devcentral, azure by psilva on August 8th, 2017

arm_logo1.jpgUse an Azure ARM template to create a high availability (active-standby) pair of BIG-IP VE instances in Microsoft Azure. When one BIG-IP VE goes standby, the other becomes active, the virtual server address is reassigned from one external NIC to another.

Today, let’s walk through how to create a high availability pair of BIG-IP VE instances in Microsoft Azure. When we’re done, we’ll have an active-standby pair of BIG-IP VEs.

To start, go to the F5 Networks Github repository.

ha1.jpg

Click F5-azure-arm-templates. Then go to Supported>ha-avset and there are two options. You can deploy into an existing stack when you already have your subnets and existing IP addresses defined but to see how it works, let’s deploy a new stack.

ha2.jpg

Click new stack and scroll down to the Deploy button. If you have a trial or production license from F5, you can use the BYOL option but in this case, we’re going to choose the PAYG option.

ha3.jpg

Click Deploy and the template opens in the Azure portal. Now we simply fill out the fields. We’ll create a new Resource Group and set a password for the BIG-IP VEs.

When you get to the questions:

The DNS label is used as part of the URL.

Instance Name is just the name of the VM in Azure.

Instance Type determines how much memory and CPU you’ll have.

Image Name determines how many BIG-IP modules you can run (and you can choose the latest BIG-IP version).

Licensed Bandwidth determines the maximum throughput of the traffic going through BIG-IP.

Select the Number of External IP addresses (we’ll start with one but can add more later). For instance, if you plan on running more than one application behind the BIG-IP, then you’ll need the appropriate external IP addresses.

Vnet Address Prefix is for the address ranges of you subnets (we’ll leave at default).

The next 3 fields (Tenant ID, Client ID, Service Principal Secret) have to do with security. Rather than using your own credentials to modify resources in Azure, you can create an Active Directory application and assign permissions to it.

The last two fields also go together. Managed Routes let you route traffic from other external networks through the BIG-IPs. The Route Table Tag means that anytime this tag is found in the route table, routes that have this destination are updated so that the next hop is the IP address of the active BIG-IP VE. This is useful if you want all outbound traffic to go through the BIG-IP or if you want to send traffic from a bunch of different Vnets through the BIG-IP.

We’ll leave the rest as default but the Restricted Src Address is good way to put IP addresses on my network – the ones that are allowed to connect to the BIG-IP.

We’ll agree to the terms and click Purchase.

ha456.jpg

We’re redirected to the Dashboard with the Deployment in Progress indicator. This takes about 15 minutes.

ha7.jpg

Once finished we’ll go check all the resources in the Resource Group.

ha8.jpg

Let’s find out where the virtual server address is located since this is associated with one of the external NICs, which have ‘ext’ in the name. Click the one you want.

ha9.jpg

Then click IP Configuration under Settings.

ha91.jpg

When you look at the IP Configuration for these NICs, whenever the NIC has two IP addresses that’s the NIC for the active BIG-IP. The Primary IP address is the BIG-IP Self IP and the Secondary IP is the virtual server address.

ha92.jpg

If we look at the other external NIC we’ll see that it only has one Self IP and that’s the Primary and it doesn’t have the Secondary virtual server address. The virtual server address is assigned to the active BIG-IP.

ha93.jpg

When we force the active BIG-IP to standby, the virtual server address is reassigned from one NIC to the other.

To see this, we’ll log into the BIG-IPs and on the active BIG-IP, we’ll click Force to Standby and the other BIG-IP becomes Active.

ha94.jpg

When we go back to Azure, we can see that the virtual server IP is no longer associated with the external NIC.

ha95.jpg

And if we wait a few minutes, we’ll see that the address is now associated with the other NIC.

ha96.jpg

Basically, how BIG-IP HA works in the Azure cloud is by reassigning the virtual server address from one BIG-IP to another. Thanks to our TechPubs group and check out the demo video.

ps




Lightboard Lessons: Attack Mitigation with F5 Silverline

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, application security, cloud, silva, video, lightboard, devcentral by psilva on July 19th, 2017

In this Lightboard Lesson, I describe how F5 Silverline Cloud-based Platform can help mitigate DDoS and other application attacks both on-prem and in the cloud with the Hybrid Signaling iApp. Learn how both on-premises and the cloud can work together to create a composite defense against attacks.

ps

 

 

Watch Now:



DevCentral Cloud Month - Week Three

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, devcentral by psilva on June 23rd, 2017

What’s this week about?

f5dccloud17.jpgWe hope you’re enjoying DevCentral’s Month thus far and Suzanne, Hitesh, Greg, Marty and Lori ready to go again this week. Last week we got you deployed in AWS and Kubernetes, learned the basics of Azure, got knee-deep in Cloud/Automated architectures and celebrated SOA’s survival. Now that your cloud is installed and running, this week we look at things like security, migration, services, automation and the challenges of data management.

Monday, Suzanne will help you secure your new AWS application with a F5 WAF; Tuesday, Hitesh will explore the Services Model for cloud architectures; Wednesday, Greg gets into Deployment Scenarios for BIG-IP in Azure; if you thought 24 minutes was quick, on Thursday Marty shows how to deploy an app into Kubernetes even faster; and Lori and her infinite cloud wisdom, wonders if the technical and data integration challenges from 10 years ago (100 in technology years) still exist for #Flashback Friday.

Great content so far and if you need to catch up or see what's coming, check out our Cloud Month Calendar.

ps




DevCentral Cloud Month - Week Two

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, devcentral by psilva on June 23rd, 2017

What's this week about?

f5dccloud17.jpgYou got a mini taste of DevCentral’s Cloud Month last week and week two we really dig in. This week we’re looking at Build and Deployment considerations for the Cloud. The first step in successfully deploying in a cloud infrastructure. Starting today, Suzanne and team show us how to deploy an application in AWS; On Wednesday, Greg, harking the Hitchhiker’s Guide, explains Azure’s Architectural Considerations; Marty uncovers Kubernetes concepts and how to deploy an application in Kubernetes this Thursday; on #Flashback Friday, Lori takes us down memory lane wondering if SOA is still super. Filling my typical Tuesday spot, Hitesh reveals some foundational building blocks and philosophy of F5’s cloud/automated architectures.

These will help get you off the ground and your head in the clouds, preferably Cloud Nine.

Enjoy!

ps

Related:




Cloud Month on DevCentral

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, application delivery, devcentral, aws, azure by psilva on June 1st, 2017

 

#DCCloud17

dc-logo.jpgThe term ‘Cloud’ as in Cloud Computing has been around for a while. Some insist Western Union invented the phrase in the 1960s; others point to a 1994 AT&T ad for the PersonaLink Services; and still others argue it was Amazon in 2006 or Google a few years later. And Gartner had Cloud Computing at the top of their Hype Cycle in 2009.

No matter the birth year, Cloud Computing has become an integral part of an organization’s infrastructure and is not going away anytime soon. A 2017 SolarWinds IT Trends report says 95% of businesses have migrated critical applications to the cloud and F5's SOAD report notes that 20% of organizations will have over half their applications in the cloud this year. It is so critical that we’ve decided to dedicate the entire month of June to the Cloud.

We’ve planned a cool cloud encounter for you this month. We’re lucky to have many of F5’s Cloud experts offering their 'how-to' expertise with multiple 4-part series. The idea is to take you through a typical F5 deployment for various cloud vendors throughout the month. Mondays, we got Suzanne Selhorn & Thomas Stanley covering AWS; Wednesdays, Greg Coward will show how to deploy in Azure; Thursdays, Marty Scholes walks us through Google Cloud deployments including Kubernetes.

But wait, there’s more!

On Tuesdays, Hitesh Patel is doing a series on the F5 Cloud/Automation Architectures and how F5 plays in the Service Model, Deployment Model and Operational Model - no matter the cloud and on F5 Friday #Flashback starting tomorrow, we’re excited to have Lori MacVittie revisit some 2008 #F5Friday cloud articles to see if anything has changed a decade later. Hint: It has…mostly. In addition, I’ll offer my weekly take on the tasks & highlights that week.

Below is the calendar for DevCentral's Cloud Month and we’ll be lighting up the links as they get published so bookmark this page and visit daily! Incidentally, I wrote my first Cloud tagged article on DevCentral back in 2009. And if you missed it, Cloud Computing won the 2017 Preakness. Cloudy Skies Ahead!

June 2017

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

28

29

30

31

1

Cloud Month Intro & Calendar

2

Flashback Friday: The Many Faces of Cloud

Lori MacVittie

3

4

5

Successfully Deploy Your Application in the AWS Public Cloud

Suzanne Selhorn

6

Cloud/Automated Systems need an Architecture

Hitesh Patel

7

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure

Greg Coward

8

Deploy an App into Kubernetes in less than 24 Minutes

Marty Scholes

9

F5 Flashback Friday: The Death of SOA Has (Still) Been Greatly Exaggerated

-Lori

10

11

12

Secure Your New AWS Application with an F5 Web Application Firewall

-Suzanne

13

The Service Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

14

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘Deployment Scenarios

-Greg

15

Deploy an App into Kubernetes Even Faster (Than Last Week)

-Marty

16

F5 Flashback Friday: Cloud and Technical Data Integration Challenges Waning

-Lori

17

18

19

Shed the Responsibility of WAF Management with F5 Cloud Interconnect

-Suzanne

20

The Deployment Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

21

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘High Availability’

-Greg

22

Deploy an App into Kubernetes Using Advanced Application Services

-Marty

23

Flashback Friday: Is Vertical Scalability Still Your Problem?

-Lori

24

25

26

​Get Back Speed and Agility of App Development in the Cloud with F5 Application Connector

-Suzanne

27

The Operational Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

28

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘Life Cycle Management’

-Greg

29

Peek under the Covers of your Kubernetes Apps

-Marty

30

Cloud Month Wrap!

 

Titles subject to change...but not by much.

ps

 




Deploying F5’s Web Application Firewall in Microsoft Azure Security Center

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, silva, microsoft, application delivery, waf, azure by psilva on May 9th, 2017

Use F5’s Web Application Firewall (WAF) to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure.

Applications living in the Cloud still need protection. Data breaches, compromised credentials, system vulnerabilities, DDoS attacks and shared resources can all pose a threat to your cloud infrastructure. The Verizon DBIR notes that web application attacks are the most likely vector for a data breach attack. While attacks on web applications account for only 8% of reported incidents, according to Verizon, they are responsible for over 40% of incidents that result in a data breach. A 2015 survey found that 15% of logins for business apps used by organizations had been breached by hackers.

One way to stay safe is using a Web Application Firewall (WAF) for your cloud deployments.

Let’s dig in on how to use F5’s WAF to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure. This solution builds on BIG-IP Application Security Manager (ASM) and BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager (LTM) technologies as a preconfigured virtual service within the Azure Security Center.

Some requirements for this deployment are:

  • You have an existing web application deployed in Azure that you want to protect with BIG-IP ASM
  • You have an F5 license token for each instance of BIG-IP ASM you want to use

To get started, log into your Azure dashboard and on the left pane, toward the bottom, you’ll see Security Center and click it.

awaf1.jpg

Next, you’ll want to click the Recommendations area within the Security Center Overview.

awaf2.jpg

And from the list of recommendations, click Add a web application firewall.

awaf3.jpg

A list of available web applications opens in a new pane. From the application list, select the application you want to secure.

awaf5.jpg

And from there click Create New. You’ll get a list of available vendors’ WAFs and choose F5 Networks.

awaf7.jpg

A new page with helpful links and information appears and at the bottom of the page, click Create.

awaf8.jpg

First, select the number of machines you want to deploy – in this case we’re deploying two machines for redundancy and high availability. Review the host entry and then type a unique password for that field. When you click Pricing Tier, you can get info about sizing and pricing. When you are satisfied, at the bottom of that pane click OK.

awaf82.jpg

Next, in the License token field, copy and paste your F5 license token. If you are only deploying one machine, you’ll only see one field. For the Security Blocking Level, you can choose Low, Medium or High. You can also click the icon for a brief description of each level. From the Application Type drop down, select the type of application you want to protect and click OK (at the bottom of that pane).

awaf83.jpg

Once you see two check marks, click the Create button.

awaf84.jpg

Azure then begins the process of the F5 WAF for your application. This process can take up to an hour. Click the little bell notification icon for the status of the deployment.

awaf8687.jpg

You’ll receive another notification when the deployment is complete.

awaf88.jpg

After the WAF is successfully deployed, you’ll want to test the new F5 WAF and finalize the setup in Azure including changing the DNS records from the current server IP to the IP of the WAF.

When ready, click Security Center again and the Recommendations panel. This time we’ll click Finalize web application firewall setup.

awaf9.jpg

And click your Web application.

awaf91.jpg

Ensure your DNS settings are correct and check the I updated my DNS Settings box and when ready, click Restrict Traffic at the bottom of the pane.

awaf92.jpg

Azure will give you a notification that it is finalizing the WAF configuration and settings, and you will get another notification when complete.

awaf93.jpg

And when it is complete, your application will be secured with F5’s Web Application Firewall.

Check out the demo video and rest easy, my friend.

ps

Related:




Deploy BIG-IP VE in Microsoft Azure Using an ARM Template

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, application delivery, devcentral, azure, access by psilva on April 12th, 2017

arm_logo1.jpgAzure Resource Manager (ARM) templates allow you to repeatedly deploy applications with confidence. The resources are deployed in a consistent state and you can easily manage and visualize resources for your application.

ARM templates take the guesswork out of creating repeatable applications and environments. Deploy and deploy again, consistently.

Let’s walk through how to deploy a simple, single-NIC configuration of BIG-IP VE in Microsoft Azure using an ARM template.

First, go to the F5 Networks Github site where we keep our supported templates. There are other community-based templates at www.github.com/f5devcentral if needed but for F5 supported templates, go to the F5 Networks site.

ave1.jpg

To view Azure templates, click f5-azure-arm-templates. In that folder you’ll see experimental and right under that is supported (the one you want).

ave2.jpg

Then click on the standalone folder and then the 1nic folder, which is the simplest deployment.

ave34.jpg

And as you scroll through and review the ‘Read Me,’ you’ll see the Deploy to Azure button under Installation. Select either Bring Your Own License (BYOL) or Pay As You Go (PAYG), depending on your situation.

ave5.jpg

This will launch the Azure Portal and the only thing you’ll really need is a license key if you chose BYOL. Then simply fill out the template.

In this case, we’re going to use an existing resource group that already contains an application.

ave7.jpg

Important: In the Settings section under Admin UN/PW, enter the credentials you want to use to log in to BIG-IP VE. The DNS Label (where you see REQUIRED) will be used to access your BIG-IP VE, for example, if you enter mybigip, the address will be something like  ‘mybigip.westus.cloudapp.azure.com.’ Give the Instance Name something familiar for easy finding.

ave9.jpg

There are different Azure Instance Types, which determine CPU and memory for your VM, and F5 licensing (Good/Better/Best), which determines the BIG-IP modules you can deploy. Then, if needed, enter your BYOL license key.

In addition, to be more secure, you should enter a range of IP addresses on your network in the Restricted Src Addresses field so it’s locked to your address range. This setting determines who gets access to the BIG-IP instance in Azure, so you’ll want to lock it down.

After the tag values, agree to the terms and conditions and click Purchase.

ave91.jpg

Next, you can monitor progress on the deploy status. Keep hitting refresh and you’ll start seeing resources getting populated along with the top blue ‘Deploying’ indicator. When the Deploying bar disappears, you know you’re done.

ave93.jpg

Once complete, you get the notification that the BIG-IP VE was deployed successfully. Next, we’ll navigate to the resource group we selected at the top and then the security group for the BIG-IP.

ave96.jpg

You can see that within the security rules we’ve allowed ports 443 (HTTPS) and 22 (SSH). 22 allows access to the management port; this is the way we’d connect to the BIG-IP to configure and administer.

ave97.jpg

Going back to the resources, the BIG-IP VE itself is listed at the top.

ave98.jpg

When we click on the Virtual BIG-IP we can get the IP address and using a browser through port 443, we can connect either with the DNS name or the IP address to the config utility.

ave97.jpg

Here you would enter the Azure credentials you specified in the template.

ave991.jpg

And that’s all there is to it. Now you can configure your virtual servers, pool, profiles and anything you’d normally do on BIG-IP VE for your unique requirements. Thanks to Suzanne Selhorn for the basis of this article and catch a video demo here.

ps

Related:

 

 




Social Login to Enterprise Apps using BIG-IP & OAuth 2.0

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud, silva, authentication, social media, devcentral by psilva on March 14th, 2017

 

social_login_gigya.jpgPassword fatigue is something we’ve all experienced at some point. Whether it’s due to breaches and the ever present, ‘update password’ warnings, the corporate policy of a 90-day rotation or simply registering for a website with yet another unique username and password. Social login or social sign-in allows people to use their existing Google, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or other social credentials to enter a web property, rather than creating a whole new account for the site. These can be used to authenticate, verify identity or to allow posting of content to social networks and the main advantage is convenience and speed.

With v13, BIG-IP APM offers a rich set of OAuth capabilities allowing organizations to implement OAuth Client, OAuth Resource Server and OAuth Authorization Server roles to implement social logins.

Let's look at BIG-IP’s capabilities (from the user's perspective) as an OAuth Client, OAuth Resource Server. We’ll navigate to our BIG-IP login screen and immediately you’ll notice it looks slightly different than your typical APM login.

sl1.jpg

Here, you now have a choice and can authenticate using any one of the 4 external resources. Azure AD Enterprise and AD B2C along with Google and Facebook. Google and Facebook are very popular social login choices - as shown in the initial image above - where organizations are looking to authenticate the users and allow them to authorize the sharing of information that Google and Facebook already have, with the application.

In this case, we have an application behind BIG-IP that is relying on getting such information from an external third party. For this, we’ll select Facebook. When we click logon, BIG-IP will redirect to the Facebook log into screen.

sl23.jpg

Now we’ll need to log into Facebook using our own personal information. And with that, Facebook has authenticated us and has sent BIG-IP critical info like name, email and other parameters.

sl4.jpg

BIG-IP has accepted the OAuth token passed to it from Facebook, extracted the info from the OAuth scope and now the application knows my identity and what resources I’m authorized to access.

We can do the same with Google. Select the option, click logon and here we’re redirected to the Google authentication page. Here again, we enter our personal credentials and arrive at the same work top.

sl564.jpg

Like Facebook, Google sent an authorization code to BIG-IP, BIG-IP validated it, extracted the username from the OAuth scope, passed it to the backend application so the application knows who I am and what I can access.

Let's look at Microsoft. For Microsoft, we can authenticate using a couple editions of Azure AD – Enterprise and B2C. Let’s see how Enterprise works. Like the others, we get redirected to Microsoftonline.com to enter our MS Enterprise credentials.

In this instance, we’re using an account that’s been Federated to Azure AD from another BIG-IP and we’ll authenticate to that BIG-IP. At this point that BIG-IP will issue a SAML assertion to Azure AD to authenticate me to Azure AD. After that, Azure AD will issue an OAuth token to that BIG-IP. BIG-IP will accept it, extract the user information and pass it to the application.

sl7894.jpg

Finally, let’s see how Azure AD B2C works. B2C is something that companies can use to store their non-corporate user base. Folks like partners, suppliers, contractors, etc. B2C allows users to maintain their own accounts and personal information. In addition, they can login using a typical Microsoft account or a Google account. In this case, we’ll simply use a Microsoft account and are directed to the Microsoft authentication page.

slb2c_all.jpg

We’ll enter our personal info, the servers communicate and we’re dropped into our WebTop of resources.

Social logins can not only help enterprises offer access to certain resources, it also improves the overall customer experience with speed and convenience and allows organizations to capture essential information about their online customers.

ps

Related:

 




Deploy BIG-IP VE in AWS

Posted in Uncategorized, f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, devcentral, aws, access by psilva on January 23rd, 2017

aws_logo.jpgCloud is all the rage these days as it has matured into a bona fide, viable option to deploy your applications. While attractive, you may also want to apply, mimic or sync your traditional data center policies like high availability, scalability and predictability in the cloud.

 




The Top 10, Top 10 Predictions for 2017

2017.jpgThe time of year when crystal balls get a viewing and many pundits put out their annual predictions for the coming year. Rather than thinking up my own, I figured I’d regurgitate what many others are expecting to happen.

8 Predictions About How the Security Industry Will Fare in 2017 – An eWeek slideshow looking at areas like IoT, ransomware, automated attacks and the security skills shortage in the industry. Chris Preimesberger (@editingwhiz), who does a monthly #eweekchat on twitter, covers many of the worries facing organizations.

10 IoT Predictions for 2017 – IoT was my number 1 in The Top 10, Top 10 Predictions for 2016 and no doubt, IoT will continue to cause havoc. People focus so much on the ‘things’ themselves rather than the risk of an internet connection. This list discusses how IoT will grow up in 2017, how having a service component will be key, the complete mess of standards and simply, ‘just because you can connect something to the Internet doesn’t mean that you should.’

10 Cloud Computing Trends to Watch in 2017 - Talkin' Cloud posts Forrester’s list of cloud computing predictions for 2017 including how hyperconverged infrastructures will help private clouds get real, ways to make cloud migration easier, the importance (or not) of megaclouds, that hybrid cloud networking will remain the weakest link in the hybrid cloud and that, finally, cloud service providers will design security into their offerings. What a novel idea.

2017 Breach Predictions: The big one is inevitable – While not a list, per se, NetworkWorld talks about how we’ll see more intricate, complex and undetected data integrity attacks and for two main reasons: financial gain and/or political manipulation. Political manipulation? No, that’ll never happen. NW talks about how cyber attacks will get worse due to IoT and gives some ideas on how to protect your data in 2017.

Catastrophic botnet to smash social media networks in 2017 – At the halfway point the Mirai botnet rears its ugly head and ZDNet explains how Mirai is far from the end of social media disruption due to botnets. With botnets-for-hire now available, there will be a significant uptick in social media botnets which aim not only to disrupt but also to earn money for their operators in 2017. Splendid.

Torrid Networks’ Top 10 Cyber Security Predictions For 2017Dhruv Soi looks at the overall cyber security industry and shares that many security product companies will add machine learning twist to their products and at the same time, there will be next-gen malware with an ability to bypass machine learning algorithms. He also talks about the fast adoption of Blockchain, the shift towards mobile exploitation and the increase of cyber insurance in 2017.

Fortinet 2017 Cybersecurity Predictions: Accountability Takes the Stage - Derek Manky goes in depth with this detailed article covering things like how IoT manufacturers will be held accountable for security breaches, how attackers will begin to turn up the heat in smart cities and if technology can close the gap on the critical cyber skills shortage. Each of his 6 predictions include a detailed description along with risks and potential solutions.

2017 security predictions – CIO always has a year-end prediction list and this year doesn’t disappoint. Rather than reviewing the obvious, they focus on things like Dwell time, or the interval between a successful attack and its discovery by the victim. In some cases, dwell times can reach as high as two years! They also detail how passwords will eventually grow up, how the security blame game will heat up and how mobile payments, too, will become a liability. Little different take and a good read.

Predictions for DevOps in 2017 – I’d be remiss if I didn’t include some prognosis about DevOps - one of the most misunderstood terms and functions of late. For DevOps, they will start to include security as part of development instead of an afterthought, we’ll see an increase in the popularity of containerization solutions and DZone sees DevOps principals moving to mainstream enterprise rather than one-off projects.

10 top holiday phishing scams – While many of the lists are forward-looking into the New Year, this one dives into the risks of the year end. Holiday shopping. A good list of holiday threats to watch out for including fake purchase invoices, scam email deals, fake surveys and shipping status malware messages begging you to click the link. Some advice: Don’t!

Bonus Prediction!

Top 10 Most Popular Robots to Buy in 2017 – All kinds of robots are now entering our homes and appearing in society. From vacuums to automated cars to drones to digital assistants, robots are interacting with us more than ever. While many are for home use, some also help with the disabled or help those suffering from various ailments like autism, a stroke or even a missing limb. They go by many monikers like Asimo, Spot, Moley, Pepper, Jibo and Milo to name a few.

Are you ready for 2017?

If you want to see if any of the previous year’s prognoses came true, here ya go:

ps





« Older episodes ·