Archive for azure

Automatically Update your BIG-IP Pool Using the Service Discovery iApp

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud computing, iApps, aws, azure by psilva on September 12th, 2017

Let’s look at how to automatically add members to your BIG-IP pool by using the Service Discovery iApp. Whenever you deploy a BIG-IP Virtual Edition by using one of the templates on the F5 Github site, this iApp is installed on the BIG-IP.

The idea behind this iApp is you assign a tag to a virtual machine in the cloud and then BIG-IP automatically discovers it and adds it to the pool. By tagging instances in AWS and Azure, and configuring the iApp, the pool is updated based on an interval you specify. This is especially helpful if you auto-scale your application servers because they are then automatically added and removed.

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Today, we’ll look how to do this in Azure but you can also do this in AWS.

First, we’re going to add a tag to the application sever in Azure. You can assign the tag to either the virtual machine or to the NIC. For auto-scaling you’d tag the scale set. This can we’ll simply add it to the virtual machine.

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When you click through the virtual machine, on the left you’ll get the ‘Tags’ option.

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This entry can be any name/value pair you want and for this we’ll use ‘mytag’ and ‘addme.’

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And we’ll click Save.

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For this exercise, we have two application servers in the resource group and already added the tags for that one. So at this point, we’re ready to get into the BIG-IP and configure the iApp.

Once in, go to Application Services>Applications>Create.

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Next, we give it a name and choose f5_service_discovery from the list.

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Scroll down the same page and fill out the open fields. Under Cloud Provider, we select Azure. Depending on your provider, there are additional questions. Add the Azure resource group and the Subscription ID. The next 3 fields (for the Azure selection) are security related: Tenant ID, Client ID and Service Principal Secret. Rather than using your own credentials to create and modify resources in Azure, you can create an Azure Active Directory application and assign permissions to that. Details are included on the Github ReadMe or the Azure documentation about service Principal.

Under the Pool area, is where you enter the name/value pair that we used for the tags in Azure. We leave the rest default. In this instance, you may notice the update interval at 60 seconds. By default, 60 seconds is the interval that BIG-IP will query Azure to see if there is a resource with the tags you specified. Under Application Health, select ‘http’ as the health monitor. Click Finished.

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When complete, we can see we got a pool with two active members in it.

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If you take the tags off one of the instances, it’ll leave the pool. Of note however, there must be two members in the pool before you remove tags from an instance. If you remove the tags from all the application servers, the pool will not be updated. BIG-IP must see at least one set of tags to update the pool because it doesn’t want to leave you with an empty pool.

Here’s the before and after of removing a tag.

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One final note. This example configuration has the BIG-IP in one resource group and the application servers in another resource group but they are all on the same Vnet. If you have separate networks in Azure, you’ll need to create a peering so they can communicate. Similarly, in AWS, you need to make sure the networking is set up so the BIG-IP can see the application servers. But, once the initial set up is working, there’s no manual intervention required.

You can use the Service Discovery method to add and remove application servers all day long without having to manually update the BIG-IP. Again, and as always, thanks to our Technical Communications team for the great material and watch the video demo here.

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Create a BIG-IP HA Pair in Azure

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, application delivery, devcentral, azure by psilva on August 8th, 2017

arm_logo1.jpgUse an Azure ARM template to create a high availability (active-standby) pair of BIG-IP VE instances in Microsoft Azure. When one BIG-IP VE goes standby, the other becomes active, the virtual server address is reassigned from one external NIC to another.

Today, let’s walk through how to create a high availability pair of BIG-IP VE instances in Microsoft Azure. When we’re done, we’ll have an active-standby pair of BIG-IP VEs.

To start, go to the F5 Networks Github repository.

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Click F5-azure-arm-templates. Then go to Supported>ha-avset and there are two options. You can deploy into an existing stack when you already have your subnets and existing IP addresses defined but to see how it works, let’s deploy a new stack.

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Click new stack and scroll down to the Deploy button. If you have a trial or production license from F5, you can use the BYOL option but in this case, we’re going to choose the PAYG option.

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Click Deploy and the template opens in the Azure portal. Now we simply fill out the fields. We’ll create a new Resource Group and set a password for the BIG-IP VEs.

When you get to the questions:

The DNS label is used as part of the URL.

Instance Name is just the name of the VM in Azure.

Instance Type determines how much memory and CPU you’ll have.

Image Name determines how many BIG-IP modules you can run (and you can choose the latest BIG-IP version).

Licensed Bandwidth determines the maximum throughput of the traffic going through BIG-IP.

Select the Number of External IP addresses (we’ll start with one but can add more later). For instance, if you plan on running more than one application behind the BIG-IP, then you’ll need the appropriate external IP addresses.

Vnet Address Prefix is for the address ranges of you subnets (we’ll leave at default).

The next 3 fields (Tenant ID, Client ID, Service Principal Secret) have to do with security. Rather than using your own credentials to modify resources in Azure, you can create an Active Directory application and assign permissions to it.

The last two fields also go together. Managed Routes let you route traffic from other external networks through the BIG-IPs. The Route Table Tag means that anytime this tag is found in the route table, routes that have this destination are updated so that the next hop is the IP address of the active BIG-IP VE. This is useful if you want all outbound traffic to go through the BIG-IP or if you want to send traffic from a bunch of different Vnets through the BIG-IP.

We’ll leave the rest as default but the Restricted Src Address is good way to put IP addresses on my network – the ones that are allowed to connect to the BIG-IP.

We’ll agree to the terms and click Purchase.

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We’re redirected to the Dashboard with the Deployment in Progress indicator. This takes about 15 minutes.

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Once finished we’ll go check all the resources in the Resource Group.

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Let’s find out where the virtual server address is located since this is associated with one of the external NICs, which have ‘ext’ in the name. Click the one you want.

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Then click IP Configuration under Settings.

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When you look at the IP Configuration for these NICs, whenever the NIC has two IP addresses that’s the NIC for the active BIG-IP. The Primary IP address is the BIG-IP Self IP and the Secondary IP is the virtual server address.

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If we look at the other external NIC we’ll see that it only has one Self IP and that’s the Primary and it doesn’t have the Secondary virtual server address. The virtual server address is assigned to the active BIG-IP.

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When we force the active BIG-IP to standby, the virtual server address is reassigned from one NIC to the other.

To see this, we’ll log into the BIG-IPs and on the active BIG-IP, we’ll click Force to Standby and the other BIG-IP becomes Active.

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When we go back to Azure, we can see that the virtual server IP is no longer associated with the external NIC.

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And if we wait a few minutes, we’ll see that the address is now associated with the other NIC.

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Basically, how BIG-IP HA works in the Azure cloud is by reassigning the virtual server address from one BIG-IP to another. Thanks to our TechPubs group and check out the demo video.

ps




Cloud Month on DevCentral

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, application delivery, devcentral, aws, azure by psilva on June 1st, 2017

 

#DCCloud17

dc-logo.jpgThe term ‘Cloud’ as in Cloud Computing has been around for a while. Some insist Western Union invented the phrase in the 1960s; others point to a 1994 AT&T ad for the PersonaLink Services; and still others argue it was Amazon in 2006 or Google a few years later. And Gartner had Cloud Computing at the top of their Hype Cycle in 2009.

No matter the birth year, Cloud Computing has become an integral part of an organization’s infrastructure and is not going away anytime soon. A 2017 SolarWinds IT Trends report says 95% of businesses have migrated critical applications to the cloud and F5's SOAD report notes that 20% of organizations will have over half their applications in the cloud this year. It is so critical that we’ve decided to dedicate the entire month of June to the Cloud.

We’ve planned a cool cloud encounter for you this month. We’re lucky to have many of F5’s Cloud experts offering their 'how-to' expertise with multiple 4-part series. The idea is to take you through a typical F5 deployment for various cloud vendors throughout the month. Mondays, we got Suzanne Selhorn & Thomas Stanley covering AWS; Wednesdays, Greg Coward will show how to deploy in Azure; Thursdays, Marty Scholes walks us through Google Cloud deployments including Kubernetes.

But wait, there’s more!

On Tuesdays, Hitesh Patel is doing a series on the F5 Cloud/Automation Architectures and how F5 plays in the Service Model, Deployment Model and Operational Model - no matter the cloud and on F5 Friday #Flashback starting tomorrow, we’re excited to have Lori MacVittie revisit some 2008 #F5Friday cloud articles to see if anything has changed a decade later. Hint: It has…mostly. In addition, I’ll offer my weekly take on the tasks & highlights that week.

Below is the calendar for DevCentral's Cloud Month and we’ll be lighting up the links as they get published so bookmark this page and visit daily! Incidentally, I wrote my first Cloud tagged article on DevCentral back in 2009. And if you missed it, Cloud Computing won the 2017 Preakness. Cloudy Skies Ahead!

June 2017

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

28

29

30

31

1

Cloud Month Intro & Calendar

2

Flashback Friday: The Many Faces of Cloud

Lori MacVittie

3

4

5

Successfully Deploy Your Application in the AWS Public Cloud

Suzanne Selhorn

6

Cloud/Automated Systems need an Architecture

Hitesh Patel

7

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure

Greg Coward

8

Deploy an App into Kubernetes in less than 24 Minutes

Marty Scholes

9

F5 Flashback Friday: The Death of SOA Has (Still) Been Greatly Exaggerated

-Lori

10

11

12

Secure Your New AWS Application with an F5 Web Application Firewall

-Suzanne

13

The Service Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

14

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘Deployment Scenarios

-Greg

15

Deploy an App into Kubernetes Even Faster (Than Last Week)

-Marty

16

F5 Flashback Friday: Cloud and Technical Data Integration Challenges Waning

-Lori

17

18

19

Shed the Responsibility of WAF Management with F5 Cloud Interconnect

-Suzanne

20

The Deployment Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

21

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘High Availability’

-Greg

22

Deploy an App into Kubernetes Using Advanced Application Services

-Marty

23

Flashback Friday: Is Vertical Scalability Still Your Problem?

-Lori

24

25

26

​Get Back Speed and Agility of App Development in the Cloud with F5 Application Connector

-Suzanne

27

The Operational Model for Cloud/Automated Systems Architecture

-Hitesh

28

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to BIG-IP in Azure – ‘Life Cycle Management’

-Greg

29

Peek under the Covers of your Kubernetes Apps

-Marty

30

Cloud Month Wrap!

 

Titles subject to change...but not by much.

ps

 




Device Discovery on BIG-IQ 5.1

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud computing, adc, application delivery, devcentral, aws, azure, access, big-iq by psilva on May 23rd, 2017

The first step in using a BIG-IQ to manage BIG-IP devices

BIG-IQ enables administrators to centrally manage BIG-IP infrastructure across the IT landscape.  BIG-IQ discovers, tracks, manages, and monitors physical and virtual BIG-IP devices - in the cloud, on premise, or co-located at your preferred datacenter.

Let’s look at how to get BIG-IQ 5.1 to gather the information needed to start managing a BIG-IP device. This gathering process is called Device Discovery.

To get started, the first thing is to logon to the BIG-IQ

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Once in, the first thing you do is let the BIG-IQ know about the BIG-IP device that you want to manage. Here, in Device Management>Inventory>BIG-IP Devices, we’ll click Add Device.

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Here we’ll need the IP address, user name and password of the device you want to manage. If the device you want to manage is part of a BIG-IP Device Service Cluster (DSC), you’ll probably want to manage that part of its configuration by adding it to a DSC group on the BIG-IQ. After selecting a DSC, tell the BIG-IQ how to handle synchronization when you deploy configuration changes so that when you deploy changes to one device, the other DSC members get the same changes. Best practice is to let BIG-IQ do the sync.

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Next click Add at the bottom of the page to start the discovery process.

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Once the device recognizes your credentials, it’ll prompt you to choose the services that you want to manage. You always select LTM, even if you only mange other services because the other services depend on LTM. To finish the device discovery task, click Discover.

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The BIG-IQ gathers the information it needs for each of the services you requested. This first step takes only a few moments while the BIG-IQ discovers your devices. You are done with discovery once the status update reads, Complete import tasks.

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Now, we need to import the service configurations that the BIG-IQ needs before we can start managing that BIG-IP device. Click the link that says, Complete import tasks.

Next, you’ll begin the process of importing the BIG-IP LTM services for this device. Just like the discovery task, you’ll import LTM first.

Click Import.

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This could take a little time depending on how many LTM objects are defined on this BIG-IP device. When the import finishes, BIG-IQ will display the date and time of when the operation was completed.

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Now, we repeat the process for the second service provisioned on this device.

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Importing an access device like BIG-IP APM is slightly different. Part of the import task is to identify the Access Group that this device uses to share its configuration. Whether you’re adding to an existing or creating a new access group, when you’re done entering the name of the group, click Add to start the import process. Here again, the time to process depends on how many BIG-IP APM configuration objects are defined on the device.

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When the BIG-IP APM services import finishes and the time completed displays, you can simply click Close to complete the task.

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You can now see that the device has been added to BIG-IQ.

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That’s it! Now you can start managing the BIG-IP LTM and APM object on this device. For this article, we only imported LTM and APM objects but the process is the same for all services you manage.

Thanks to our TechPubs group and watch the video demo here.

ps

Related:

What is BIG-IQ




Deploying F5’s Web Application Firewall in Microsoft Azure Security Center

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, cloud, cloud computing, silva, microsoft, application delivery, waf, azure by psilva on May 9th, 2017

Use F5’s Web Application Firewall (WAF) to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure.

Applications living in the Cloud still need protection. Data breaches, compromised credentials, system vulnerabilities, DDoS attacks and shared resources can all pose a threat to your cloud infrastructure. The Verizon DBIR notes that web application attacks are the most likely vector for a data breach attack. While attacks on web applications account for only 8% of reported incidents, according to Verizon, they are responsible for over 40% of incidents that result in a data breach. A 2015 survey found that 15% of logins for business apps used by organizations had been breached by hackers.

One way to stay safe is using a Web Application Firewall (WAF) for your cloud deployments.

Let’s dig in on how to use F5’s WAF to protect web applications deployed in Microsoft Azure. This solution builds on BIG-IP Application Security Manager (ASM) and BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager (LTM) technologies as a preconfigured virtual service within the Azure Security Center.

Some requirements for this deployment are:

  • You have an existing web application deployed in Azure that you want to protect with BIG-IP ASM
  • You have an F5 license token for each instance of BIG-IP ASM you want to use

To get started, log into your Azure dashboard and on the left pane, toward the bottom, you’ll see Security Center and click it.

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Next, you’ll want to click the Recommendations area within the Security Center Overview.

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And from the list of recommendations, click Add a web application firewall.

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A list of available web applications opens in a new pane. From the application list, select the application you want to secure.

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And from there click Create New. You’ll get a list of available vendors’ WAFs and choose F5 Networks.

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A new page with helpful links and information appears and at the bottom of the page, click Create.

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First, select the number of machines you want to deploy – in this case we’re deploying two machines for redundancy and high availability. Review the host entry and then type a unique password for that field. When you click Pricing Tier, you can get info about sizing and pricing. When you are satisfied, at the bottom of that pane click OK.

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Next, in the License token field, copy and paste your F5 license token. If you are only deploying one machine, you’ll only see one field. For the Security Blocking Level, you can choose Low, Medium or High. You can also click the icon for a brief description of each level. From the Application Type drop down, select the type of application you want to protect and click OK (at the bottom of that pane).

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Once you see two check marks, click the Create button.

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Azure then begins the process of the F5 WAF for your application. This process can take up to an hour. Click the little bell notification icon for the status of the deployment.

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You’ll receive another notification when the deployment is complete.

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After the WAF is successfully deployed, you’ll want to test the new F5 WAF and finalize the setup in Azure including changing the DNS records from the current server IP to the IP of the WAF.

When ready, click Security Center again and the Recommendations panel. This time we’ll click Finalize web application firewall setup.

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And click your Web application.

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Ensure your DNS settings are correct and check the I updated my DNS Settings box and when ready, click Restrict Traffic at the bottom of the pane.

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Azure will give you a notification that it is finalizing the WAF configuration and settings, and you will get another notification when complete.

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And when it is complete, your application will be secured with F5’s Web Application Firewall.

Check out the demo video and rest easy, my friend.

ps

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Deploy BIG-IP VE in Microsoft Azure Using an ARM Template

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud, application delivery, devcentral, azure, access by psilva on April 12th, 2017

arm_logo1.jpgAzure Resource Manager (ARM) templates allow you to repeatedly deploy applications with confidence. The resources are deployed in a consistent state and you can easily manage and visualize resources for your application.

ARM templates take the guesswork out of creating repeatable applications and environments. Deploy and deploy again, consistently.

Let’s walk through how to deploy a simple, single-NIC configuration of BIG-IP VE in Microsoft Azure using an ARM template.

First, go to the F5 Networks Github site where we keep our supported templates. There are other community-based templates at www.github.com/f5devcentral if needed but for F5 supported templates, go to the F5 Networks site.

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To view Azure templates, click f5-azure-arm-templates. In that folder you’ll see experimental and right under that is supported (the one you want).

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Then click on the standalone folder and then the 1nic folder, which is the simplest deployment.

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And as you scroll through and review the ‘Read Me,’ you’ll see the Deploy to Azure button under Installation. Select either Bring Your Own License (BYOL) or Pay As You Go (PAYG), depending on your situation.

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This will launch the Azure Portal and the only thing you’ll really need is a license key if you chose BYOL. Then simply fill out the template.

In this case, we’re going to use an existing resource group that already contains an application.

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Important: In the Settings section under Admin UN/PW, enter the credentials you want to use to log in to BIG-IP VE. The DNS Label (where you see REQUIRED) will be used to access your BIG-IP VE, for example, if you enter mybigip, the address will be something like  ‘mybigip.westus.cloudapp.azure.com.’ Give the Instance Name something familiar for easy finding.

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There are different Azure Instance Types, which determine CPU and memory for your VM, and F5 licensing (Good/Better/Best), which determines the BIG-IP modules you can deploy. Then, if needed, enter your BYOL license key.

In addition, to be more secure, you should enter a range of IP addresses on your network in the Restricted Src Addresses field so it’s locked to your address range. This setting determines who gets access to the BIG-IP instance in Azure, so you’ll want to lock it down.

After the tag values, agree to the terms and conditions and click Purchase.

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Next, you can monitor progress on the deploy status. Keep hitting refresh and you’ll start seeing resources getting populated along with the top blue ‘Deploying’ indicator. When the Deploying bar disappears, you know you’re done.

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Once complete, you get the notification that the BIG-IP VE was deployed successfully. Next, we’ll navigate to the resource group we selected at the top and then the security group for the BIG-IP.

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You can see that within the security rules we’ve allowed ports 443 (HTTPS) and 22 (SSH). 22 allows access to the management port; this is the way we’d connect to the BIG-IP to configure and administer.

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Going back to the resources, the BIG-IP VE itself is listed at the top.

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When we click on the Virtual BIG-IP we can get the IP address and using a browser through port 443, we can connect either with the DNS name or the IP address to the config utility.

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Here you would enter the Azure credentials you specified in the template.

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And that’s all there is to it. Now you can configure your virtual servers, pool, profiles and anything you’d normally do on BIG-IP VE for your unique requirements. Thanks to Suzanne Selhorn for the basis of this article and catch a video demo here.

ps

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Lightboard Lessons: BIG-IP in Hybrid Environments

Posted in security, f5, big-ip, ssl vpn, cloud, silva, application delivery, lightboard, devcentral, remote access, saml, aws, azure, saas by psilva on October 12th, 2016

A hybrid infrastructure allows organizations to distribute their applications when it makes sense and provide global fault tolerance to the system overall. Depending on how an organization’s disaster recovery infrastructure is designed, this can be an active site, a hot-standby, some leased hosting space, a cloud provider or some other contained compute location. As soon as that server, application, or even location starts to have trouble, organizations can seamlessly maneuver around the issue and continue to deliver their applications.

Driven by applications and workloads, a hybrid environment is a technology strategy to integrate the mix of on premise and off-premise data compute resources. In this Lightboard Lesson, I explain how BIG-IP can help facilitate hybrid infrastructures.

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TechEd2013 – Network Virtualization & Cloud Solutions

Posted in f5, big-ip, cloud computing, silva, video, microsoft, application delivery, technology, azure, hyper-v by psilva on June 3rd, 2013

I chat with Jeff Bellamy, F5 Director Business Development, about the new F5 network virtualization and cloud solutions announced at Microsoft’s North America TechEd.  We discuss the F5/Microsoft Partnership along with the benefits customers realize in combining F5 application delivery services with the flexibility of Microsoft Windows Server 2012 and System Center 2012 offerings.  F5 technologies are featured in a number of conference activities, including speaking presentations from Microsoft and demonstrations of how enterprises and service providers can rapidly and efficiently scale network and cloud resources to support their IT initiatives without compromise.

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Connect with Peter: Connect with F5:
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